Woman Survives Six Days in Remote Arizona Riverbed After Crashing Her Car

In this Oct. 18, 2018, photo provided by the Arizona Department of Public Safety is the scene where authorities say they rescued a seriously injured woman who spent six days in the desert after crashing her car near Wickenburg, Ariz. The Department of Public Safety said Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2018, that rescuers found the severely dehydrated 53-year-old woman on Oct. 18 after following the vehicle’s tracks. A maintenance crew and a rancher spotted the car while working along a highway several miles from the historic Western town of Wickenburg. (Arizona Department of Public Safety via AP)

A motorist survived six harrowing days alone along a remote Arizona riverbed after crashing through a fence and landing in a tree, officials said Wednesday.

In this Oct. 18, 2018, photo provided by the Arizona Department of Public Safety is the scene where authorities say they rescued a seriously injured woman who spent six days in the desert after crashing her car near Wickenburg, Ariz. The Department of Public Safety said Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2018, that rescuers found the severely dehydrated 53-year-old woman on Oct. 18 after following the vehicle’s tracks. A maintenance crew and a rancher spotted the car while working along a highway several miles from the historic Western town of Wickenburg. (Arizona Department of Public Safety via AP)

The unidentified 53-year-old woman lost control of her car on rain-slicked U.S. Route 60 near milepost 117 on Oct. 12 in Wickenburg, Arizona, about 65 miles north of Phoenix, according to the Arizona Department of Safety.

She was wearing a t-shirt, shorts and flip-flops and survived on grass and water before she was found nearly a week later, said rescuer and local rancher David “D.J.” Moralez.

“I don’t know if she could have made it there another night,” Moralez, 30, told NBC News. “She was in pretty rough shape when we found her.”

The woman’s car fell about 50 feet down a ravine, “landing in a mesquite tree where it remained suspended above the ground,” the department said. She remained in the tree-top car for several days before finally climbing out to seek help, authorities said.

Then finally on Oct. 18, a state Department of Transportation (ADOT) crew was working along U.S. 60, corralling a cow, when Moralez happened to be driving and spotted his brother Zachary on that crew.

The rancher stopped to chat with his brother and just as they were ending their chance meeting, they spotted a hole in the fence where the car had crashed.

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SOURCE: NBC News, David K. Li