WATCH: Tim Tebow Shares Details of His ‘Epic’ CBS Competition Series “Million Dollar Mile”

“Victory is Only a Mile Away” — On the series premiere of MILLION DOLLAR MILE, contestants are given a two-minute head start as they face off against the Defenders, a group of elite athletes whose goal is to defend the million-dollar prize, in the most challenging one-mile course ever designed, in the streets of downtown Los Angeles, Wednesday, March 27 (9:00-10:00 PM, ET/PT) on the CBS Television Network. The series is hosted by former college football champion and NFL quarterback Tim Tebow, with Matt “Money” Smith and Maria Taylor serving as play-by-play commentators. Pictured (L-R): Tim Tebow and Rhandi Orme. Photo: Michael Yarish/CBS é2018 CBS Broadcasting, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Tim Tebow brings his competitive edge to “Million Dollar Mile,” the obstacle-course competition series he’s hosting on CBS.

“Although I’ve never been an obstacle-course racer I know what it’s like to be able to try to handle the pressure and the lights and push yourself past limits you didn’t think were possible,” says Tebow, 31.

The former Heisman Trophy winner, NFL quarterback (Jets, Broncos) and current Mets hopeful — he’ll start the season with the team’s Triple-A affiliate in Syracuse — taped his 10-episode “Million Dollar Mile” gig late last fall.

In the series — premiering Wednesday, March 27 (9 p.m.) — contestants (“Runners”) tackle a grueling obstacle course and try to claim the $1 million grand prize while battling a team of elite athletes (“Defenders,” including Emma Chapman, aka “The Mighty Kiwi”) trying to stop them. LA Chargers play-by-play announcer Matt “Money” Smith and ESPN host/reporter Maria Taylor provide the commentary.

“Million Dollar Mile” was not taped under the lights of a TV studio but under the streetlights of downtown LA, on which the obstacle course was constructed. “I gotta be honest, I think that adds to the pressure of it,” Tebow says of the locale. “You’re in the moment, the bigness of it, the feel of it when it’s lit up at night with the colors and it just looks so cool.

“We would film late, then I would sleep in, wake up and go train with the USC baseball team and then head back to the set to look over what we were going to do for the next night,” he says. “I think the biggest challenge for me, to be honest with you, is that I was so into it that I was losing my voice. Between every race I had to have tea with lemon and ginger and honey in it.

“But that’s me,” he says. “If I had to be not emotional or just [be] a stick up there I probably wouldn’t have been the right guy [to host the show]. If you’ve seen me play you know I’m very emotional and passionate and wear my emotions on my sleeve. It’s the same for me in this role.”

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SOURCE: New York Post, by Michael Starr