Live Coverage: Hurricane Matthew Hits Florida, Knocks Out Power for Over 100,000 People

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Click here to watch live video coverage of Hurricane Matthew

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  • Hurricane Matthew started hitting Florida early Friday morning with heavy rain and strong winds

  • Powerful storm claimed at least 340 lives after it ripped through the Dominican Republic and Haiti Tuesday
  • Orlando’s world-famous theme parks – Walt Disney World, Universal Studios and SeaWorld – all closed 
  • President Barack Obama has declared a federal state of emergency in Florida, Georgia and South Carolina
  • The storm intensified to a ‘catastrophic’ Category Four Thursday morning with sustained winds of 130mph 
  • Could bring a storm surge of up to 11 feet in some areas and drop up to 15 inches of rain on Florida
  • Already 95,000 have been left without power in Florida and up to seven million more could suffer outages
  • Matthew could also absorb or combine with Hurricane Nicole, which has formed off coast of Bermuda 
  • National Weather Service has advised ‘loss of life’ and ‘immense human suffering’ is possible  
  • Two million people in the US were urged to evacuate their homes in preparation for a ‘direct hit’
  • Gov. Scott warned Florida warned that the storm ‘is going to kill people’ after declaring a state emergency  
  • Disney has confirmed that all its Florida theme parks have now closed and won’t reopen until Saturday  

Hurricane Matthew started pelting Florida with heavy rains and tropical force winds early Friday morning, as the full force of the ‘monster’ storm has yet to strike and is expected to cause devastation across the East Coast.

Government officials declared a state of emergency in several states in an effort to plan ahead since the deadly Category Four storm is expected to wreak havoc with its 130mph winds.

Two million people across the Southeast were warned to flee inland as tens of millions along 500 miles of coastline battened down the hatches. Around

The ‘once-in-a-lifetime’ storm is the most powerful hurricane to threaten the U.S. Atlantic coast in more than a decade and could be the most catastrophic to hit the north and east of Florida in 118 years.

Rescue officials announced late Thursday night that it is too dangerous to go out into the storm and have suspended rescue services in several counties.

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Downed: Hurricane Matthew started pelting Florida with heavy rains and tropical force winds early Friday morning. A large tree was uprooted by the strong and powerful winds from the hurricane blocking West Plumosa Lane in Lake Worth Friday

Downed: Hurricane Matthew started pelting Florida with heavy rains and tropical force winds early Friday morning. A large tree was uprooted by the strong and powerful winds from the hurricane blocking West Plumosa Lane in Lake Worth Friday

Hurricane Matthew started hitting the East Coast early Friday morning leaving debris from palm trees and shrubs in the streets as pictured above in Indian River County, Florida

Hurricane Matthew started hitting the East Coast early Friday morning leaving debris from palm trees and shrubs in the streets as pictured above in Indian River County, Florida

The Tropical Force Winds have already started doing damage, as pictured above in Indian River County in Florida early Friday morning

The Tropical Force Winds have already started doing damage, as pictured above in Indian River County in Florida early Friday morning

The powerful tropical storm-force winds started whipping trees around in Palm Bay, Florida (above) late Thursday evening, as the 'once-in-a-lifetime' storm made its way to the East Coast

The powerful tropical storm-force winds started whipping trees around in Palm Bay, Florida (above) late Thursday evening, as the ‘once-in-a-lifetime’ storm made its way to the East Coast

Rescue officials announced late Thursday night that it is too dangerous to go out into the storm and have suspended rescue services in several counties in Florida. Pictured above is West Palm Beach around 12:30am on Friday

Rescue officials announced late Thursday night that it is too dangerous to go out into the storm and have suspended rescue services in several counties in Florida. Pictured above is West Palm Beach around 12:30am on Friday

The wind was blowing around 60mph in West Palm Beach as the hurricane started making it's way to the East Coast around 12:30am on Friday

The wind was blowing around 60mph in West Palm Beach as the hurricane started making it’s way to the East Coast around 12:30am on Friday

Heavy rainfall also started in West Palm Beach early Friday morning as the storm is expected to be catastrophic

Heavy rainfall also started in West Palm Beach early Friday morning as the storm is expected to be catastrophic

The only and last Category Four hurricane to make landfall anywhere in northeast Florida or the Georgia coast was in 1898, according to The Weather Channel.

As of midnight on Friday, the storm was moving northwest at 13mph with winds at 130mph as it was 60 miles east of Fort Pierce, Florida.

The devastating hurricane had already left more than 340 dead by Friday morning in its wake across the Caribbean as it laid waste to large swathes of coastal Haiti.

Ed Rappaport, deputy director of the Miami-based National Hurricane Center in Miami, said: ‘What we know is that most of the lives lost in hurricanes is due to storm surge.’

‘This storm’s a monster,’ Governor Rick Scott warned as it started lashing the state with periodic heavy rains and squalls around nightfall. He added: ‘I’m going to pray for everybody’s safety.’

‘The storm has already killed people. We should expect the same impact in Florida,’ the governor warned.

As it moved north in the evening on Thursday, Matthew stayed about 100 miles or more off South Florida, sparing the 4.4 million people in the Miami and Fort Lauderdale areas from its most punishing effects.

Powerful: Dark clouds were pictured above Disney World in Orlando, Florida on Thursday as Hurricane Matthew made its way towards the East Coast

Powerful: Dark clouds were pictured above Disney World in Orlando, Florida on Thursday as Hurricane Matthew made its way towards the East Coast

The intense storm rolled into Coquina Beach in Florida on Thursday afternoon, as the beach was nearly empty of people

The intense storm rolled into Coquina Beach in Florida on Thursday afternoon, as the beach was nearly empty of people

Even before the full force of the powerful storm hits, tens of thousands of people have already been left without power in some parts of the sunshine state. Above palm trees sway in high gusts of wind on Thursday in Vero Beach, Florida

Even before the full force of the powerful storm hits, tens of thousands of people have already been left without power in some parts of the sunshine state. Above palm trees sway in high gusts of wind on Thursday in Vero Beach, Florida

The clouds covered over the Harry Potter ride at the Disney theme park, making it look and feel very creepy on Thursday

The clouds covered over the Harry Potter ride at the Disney theme park, making it look and feel very creepy on Thursday

By Thursday night, more than 95,000 homes and businesses were without power. Up to seven million are under threat of losing power as Matthew smashes its way across the Sunshine State.

The hurricane picked up wind speed as it closed in, growing from a possibly devastating Category 3 storm to a potentially catastrophic Category 4.

Forecasters said it could dump up to 15 inches of rain in some spots and cause a storm surge of 9 feet or more.

President Barack Obama declared a state of emergency for Florida and South Carolina, freeing up federal money and personnel to protect lives and property.

The Fort Lauderdale airport shut down, and the Orlando airport planned to do so as well. The Palm Beach International Airport reported a wind gust of 50 mph with the center of the storm 70 miles offshore, the National Hurricane Center said. Airlines canceled more than 3,000 flights Thursday and Friday, many of them in or out of Miami and Fort Lauderdale.

People leave Disney's Magic Kingdom theme park, in heavy rain, after it closed in Orlando, Florida in preparation for the landfall of Hurricane Matthew on Thursday

People leave Disney’s Magic Kingdom theme park, in heavy rain, after it closed in Orlando, Florida in preparation for the landfall of Hurricane Matthew on Thursday

A lone taxi heads toward the Walt Disney World Resort area in Orlando, Florida, before the landfall of Hurricane Matthew on Thursday

A lone taxi heads toward the Walt Disney World Resort area in Orlando, Florida, before the landfall of Hurricane Matthew on Thursday

Ivonne Morales comforts her sleeping baby, 9-month-old Bruno Ponce, at the Red Cross shelter at the Samuel S. Gaines Academy building in Fort Pierce Florida on Thursday

Ivonne Morales comforts her sleeping baby, 9-month-old Bruno Ponce, at the Red Cross shelter at the Samuel S. Gaines Academy building in Fort Pierce Florida on Thursday

Amtrak suspended train service between Miami and New York, and cruise lines rerouted ships to avoid the storm, which in some cases will mean more days at sea.

Orlando’s world-famous theme parks – Walt Disney World, Universal Studios and SeaWorld – all closed.

Streets in Vero Beach were partially covered with water, and hotel guests in Orlando were told to stay inside, though a few sneaked out to smoke or watch the rain.

The lobby of the Loews Sapphire Falls Resort was crowded with people and pets, including dogs occasionally snapping at each other. Some meals were served buffet style while other people waited more than two hours for a pizza delivery.

The hurricane was expected to blow ashore – or come dangerously close to doing so – early on Friday north of Palm Beach County, which has about 1.4 million people, and then slowly push north for the next 12 hours along the Interstate 95 corridor, through Cape Canaveral and Jacksonville, according to the National Hurricane Center.

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Thousands of people hunkered down in schools converted to shelters, and inland hotels in places such as Charlotte, North Carolina, reported brisk business.

At the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, NASA no longer has to worry about rolling space shuttles back from the launch pad to the hangar because of hurricanes, since the shuttle fleet is now retired. But the spaceflight company SpaceX was concerned about the storm’s effect on its leased seaside pad.

Forecasters said it would then probably hug the coast of Georgia and South Carolina over the weekend before veering out to sea – perhaps even looping back toward Florida in the middle of next week as a tropical storm.

Millions of people in Florida, Georgia and South Carolina were told to evacuate their homes, and interstate highways were turned into one-way routes to speed the exodus.

The Weather Channel warned late Thursday that this storm is expected to make ‘history’ and is ‘like no storm in the record books,’ as central and north Florida have never been hit by a hurricane this strong. Even before the full force of the powerful storm hits, tens of thousands of people have already been left without power in some parts of the sunshine state.

People wait to check in at a Red Cross shelter at Trinity On The Hill Methodist church as Hurricane Matthew approaches the Georgia coast in Augusta, Georgia on Thursday

People wait to check in at a Red Cross shelter at Trinity On The Hill Methodist church as Hurricane Matthew approaches the Georgia coast in Augusta, Georgia on Thursday

About 1.5 million people in Florida have been told to flee inland as the dangerous and life-threatening Category Four storm could become a Category Five and siege on the east coast of the state. Above Daytona Beach is pictured on Thursday

About 1.5 million people in Florida have been told to flee inland as the dangerous and life-threatening Category Four storm could become a Category Five and siege on the east coast of the state. Above Daytona Beach is pictured on Thursday

About 1.5 million people in Florida have been told to go inland as the dangerous and life-threatening Category Four storm could become a Category Five and siege on the east coast of the state destroying homes and building structures and knocking down trees.

The storm that’s packing winds of up to 145mph started hitting Florida by early Friday morning, as weather forecasters predict it will bring a dangerous storm surge to some parts of the state that will be even worse than what happened in New Jersey during Super Storm Sandy in 2012.

Destructive winds and flooding is expected to stretch into Georgia and South Carolina moving up the coast by the weekend.

Weather forecasters say the eye of the hurricane may never make landfall, however, the eyewall which contains the strongest winds, may do so.

Florida Gov. Rick Scott advised on Thursday evening that residents still have time to evacuate, but to do so quickly.

‘We are already starting to see the impacts (from Hurricane Matthew), and it’s a monster,’ Scott said. ‘You still have time to leave. Get out. There’s no reason to take a chance.’  

The storm that's packing winds of up to 145mph is expected to hit Southeast Florida by Thursday evening through early Friday. Above Daytona Beach is pictured on Thursday

The storm that’s packing winds of up to 145mph is expected to hit Southeast Florida by Thursday evening through early Friday. Above Daytona Beach is pictured on Thursday

Weather forecasters predict it will bring a dangerous storm surge to some parts of the state that will be even worse than what happened in New Jersey during Super Storm Sandy in 2012. Above Daytona Beach is pictured on Thursday

Weather forecasters predict it will bring a dangerous storm surge to some parts of the state that will be even worse than what happened in New Jersey during Super Storm Sandy in 2012. Above Daytona Beach is pictured on Thursday

Destructive winds and flooding is expected to stretch into Georgia and South Carolina moving up the coast by the weekend. Above Daytona Beach is pictured on Thursday

Destructive winds and flooding is expected to stretch into Georgia and South Carolina moving up the coast by the weekend. Above Daytona Beach is pictured on Thursday

Pet owners and their pets sit in the lobby of a storm shelter set up at the Barnett Park community center to accommodate evacuees during Hurricane Matthew on Thursday

Pet owners and their pets sit in the lobby of a storm shelter set up at the Barnett Park community center to accommodate evacuees during Hurricane Matthew on Thursday

Traffic stacks up on I-75 North as people left the Georgia coast to beat out Hurricane Matthew on Thursday

Traffic stacks up on I-75 North as people left the Georgia coast to beat out Hurricane Matthew on Thursday

Many boarded up their homes and businesses and left them to the mercy of the storm.

‘We’re not going to take any chances on this one,’ said Daniel Myras, who struggled to find enough plywood to protect his restaurant, the Cruising Cafe, two blocks from the Daytona Beach boardwalk.

More than two million people have been warned that their ‘time is up’ if they have not yet evacuated with ‘killer’ Hurricane Matthew just hours away from hitting Florida’s south coast.

President Barack Obama declared a federal state of emergency in South Carolina, Georgia and Florida and thousands of families were caught in gridlock across those states and up the East Coast while trying to flee.

‘Time is up. You have to evacuate now if you are in an evacuation zone,’ Scott warned Thursday afternoon.

‘To everyone on Florida’s east coast, if you are reluctant to evacuate, just think of all the people the Hurricane has already killed. You and your family could be among these numbers if you don’t take this seriously.’

The powerful hurricane, the fiercest Caribbean storm in nearly a decade, has already killed at least 299 people in Haiti and the Dominican Republic. At its height, the hurricane was a Category Five with wind speeds of more than 157 mph.

The National Weather Service has advised that ‘loss of life’ and ‘immense human suffering’ is possible for those who don’t take precautions. It could also potentially leave approximately seven million people without power.

The Florida governor warned that the threat of the ‘deadly’ storm was real as he reiterated a call for people to evacuate.

‘Waves will be crashing on roofs. Homes will be destroyed. This is deadly. We have suspended tolls, doubled the amount of shelters and are making sure we keep the roads as clear as possible. There is absolutely no reason not to leave. If you chose to stay and try to ride the storm out, your life is at risk.’

Police patrolled St. Augustine, Florida, neighborhoods, announcing through a bullhorn that the area is in a mandatory evacuation zone as Hurricane Matthew approached the state Thursday evening.

Dana Harrison, who lives on a barrier island across from Anastasia State Park, said she planned to wait out the storm with an out-of-town friend and her cat.

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Ominous dark clouds signal the approaching hurricane headed towards Miami in Florida on Thursday

Dark storms gather overhead at the beach in Miami, Florida where the storm is expected to hit overnight 

Dark storms gather overhead at the beach in Miami, Florida where the storm is expected to hit overnight

Storm clouds rolled in around 4pm on the Siesta Key Beach; The storm is expected to be one of the most powerful ones to hit in decades

Storm clouds rolled in around 4pm on the Siesta Key Beach; The storm is expected to be one of the most powerful ones to hit in decades

That's one way to keep them from blowing away! In Orlando, Florida, one enterprising pool attendant decided to chuck all the sun loungers into the water to avoid more clean up

That’s one way to keep them from blowing away! In Orlando, Florida, one enterprising pool attendant decided to chuck all the sun loungers into the water to avoid more clean up

Traffic as far as the eye can see: Thousands of families have been caught in gridlock across the state and up the East Coast into the Carolinas and Georgia, as they flee their homes ahead of the storm - while the National Guard trucks drive towards the evacuation zones to assist 

Traffic as far as the eye can see: Thousands of families have been caught in gridlock across the state and up the East Coast into the Carolinas and Georgia, as they flee their homes ahead of the storm – while the National Guard trucks drive towards the evacuation zones to assist

Traffic stacks up on I-75 North fleeing the coast and Hurricane Matthew on Thursday near McDonough, Georgia

Traffic stacks up on I-75 North fleeing the coast and Hurricane Matthew on Thursday near McDonough, Georgia

Local law enforcement works, with members of the National Guard to keep an evacuation route clear on I-26 during preparations for the expected arrival of Hurricane Matthew in Charleston, South Carolina, on Thursday

Local law enforcement works, with members of the National Guard to keep an evacuation route clear on I-26 during preparations for the expected arrival of Hurricane Matthew in Charleston, South Carolina, on Thursday

More than two million people in the US have been urged to evacuate their homes before Hurricane Matthew hits the East Coast tonight (people walk along Miami Beach, Florida, October 6)

More than two million people in the US have been urged to evacuate their homes before Hurricane Matthew hits the East Coast tonight (people walk along Miami Beach, Florida, October 6)

A man rides his bicycle along the beach prior to the arrival of Hurricane Matthew in Miami Beach on Thursday 

A man rides his bicycle along the beach prior to the arrival of Hurricane Matthew in Miami Beach on Thursday

The 57-year-old Harrison says she used to live in St. Thomas and survived Hurricane Hugo in 1989, though the storm destroyed her house. She said she feels more secure in her current home.

In Sandown, New Hampshire on Thursday night, Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump warned that the hurricane ‘looks like it’s a big one and it looks like it’s going to be a bad one.’

‘Hopefully it takes that right turn,’ he said.

Speaking into a TV camera, he said his investments, friends and employees in southeast Florida could be in for a devastating hit.

‘Please know that we are praying for you and everyone in the path,’ he said. ‘You’ve got to take care of yourself, you’ve got to get out of the area. You’ve got to listen. You’ve got a great governor … it could be a really bad one.’

Trump also pledged that people in the devastated country of Haiti wouldn’t be left to recover on their own following the deaths of more than 260 people there.

‘To the folks in Haiti and all over, we’re going to be helping you … we send our best wishes and prayers.’

NASA is bracing for its first hurricane without space shuttles to worry about. Now it’s SpaceX and Boeing fretting about hurricane-force wind and equally devastating storm surges.

Before the shuttle fleet’s retirement in 2011, rollbacks from the launch pads were commonplace during hurricane season at Kennedy Space Center. Now both pads are empty, at least for the time being.

NASA is modifying Launch Complex 39B for its still-in-development Space Launch System mega-rockets intended for outer-space travel. SpaceX is leasing the other pad, 39A, from where Apollo astronauts departed for the moon and multiple shuttle flights began.

SpaceX was counting on this historic pad to get its rockets flying again, possibly in November, once modifications were complete. The SpaceX pad at neighboring Cape Canaveral Air Force Station was damaged September 1 when a Falcon rocket exploded during prelaunch testing.

HURRICANE MATTHEW’S PREDICTED PATH OF DESTRUCTION THROUGH THE EAST COAST

Thursday:  6pm

Matthew, a Category Four hurricane, will move northwest from the Bahamas towards south Florida and Miami which is expected to experience wind speeds of up to 75mph.

Thursday: Midnight

Wind speeds in Miami will drop as low as 50mph, while in Melbourne, Florida, which is around 180 miles north, speeds will pick up to more than 75mph.

Friday: 8am

Hurricane Matthew will make a direct hit on Melbourne at 8am, with wind speeds of more than 130mph but will weaken as it moved north along Florida’s East Coast.

Friday: 8pm 

By the time it hits Jacksonville, Florida at 8pm, Friday, the hurricane will have dropped down to a Category Three with wind speeds of between 110mph and 130mph.

Wind speeds will once again begin to drop as the storm moved north into Georgia.

Saturday: 8am 

Matthew will hit Savannah Georgia but wind speeds will have dropped to less than 110mph making it a Class Two.

The hurricane will sustain wind speeds of between 96-110 mph as it moved northeast along the coastal regions of South Carolina

Saturday: 8pm

Matthew is expected to hit Myrtle Beach, South Carolina with maximum wind speeds of 110mph.

The storm will then move northeast, brushing the south coast of North Carolina overnight, and moving out to sea into the Atlantic.

Sunday:  8am

The hurricane will be over the Atlantic, although residents along the North Carolina coast may still experience some high winds. The storm will continue to move in a southeasterly direction over the ocean into Tuesday.

A national state of emergency was declared in Florida on Thursday after calls from Scott,  which grants resources from the federal government such as food, water and tarps.

President Obama warned: ‘I want to emphasize to the public – this is a serious storm. If there is an evacuation order in your community, you need to take it seriously.’

‘Just remember that you can always rebuild,’ he added. ‘You can always repair property. You cannot restore a life if it is lost and we want to make sure that we minimize any possible loss of life or risk to people in these areas.

The storm gained new muscle over the Bahamas on Thursday morning as it battered the island, intensifying from a Category Three with wind speeds of 120mph, to Category Four with 140mph speeds.

The National Hurricane Center warned at 5am that it was about 60 miles south-southeast of Nassau, the capital, which is located on New Providence – home to about 70 per cent of the country’s 250,000 people.

Forecasters said the hurricane is likely to hit Florida at around 8am on Friday before heading northwards past Orlando, Jacksonville and up to Charleston, according to WSVN.

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'True Color' satellite image of hurricanes Matthew and Hurricane Nicole as they swirl towards Florida. Hurricane Nicole is now a Category Two storm as of late Thursday evening

‘True Color’ satellite image of hurricanes Matthew and Hurricane Nicole as they swirl towards Florida. Hurricane Nicole is now a Category Two storm as of late Thursday evening

There are fears that Hurricane Matthew could interact with Hurricane Nicole which has been forming further east over the Atlantic. As of late Thursday evening, Hurricane Nicole is a Category Two storm

There are fears that Hurricane Matthew could interact with Hurricane Nicole which has been forming further east over the Atlantic. As of late Thursday evening, Hurricane Nicole is a Category Two storm

The powerful storm is expected to move up the coast and it will gradually lose speed but the winds will still be as high as 110mph on Saturday morning

The powerful storm is expected to move up the coast and it will gradually lose speed but the winds will still be as high as 110mph on Saturday morning

Forecasters predict Matthew has strengthened to a Category Four hurricane, with speeds of more than 140mph

Forecasters predict Matthew has strengthened to a Category Four hurricane, with speeds of more than 140mph

Matthew is expected to eventually head back into the Atlantic after making its way up past the East Coast but there are fears it could collide with Nicole, another hurricane forming 345 miles south of Bermuda. By late Thursday evening, Nicole had become a Category Two hurricane.

‘DON’T #PRAYFORFLORIDA PRAY FOR THE PEOPLE IN HAITI WHO HAD NOWHERE TO GO’

With Hurricane Matthews landfall just hours away in Florida, the hashtag #PrayForFlorida is going viral on Twitter.

But some Floridians would like the support diverted away to those who may need it more.

The Category 4 hurricane has already ripped through Haiti and the Bahamas, where locals don’t have the options to flee from the eye of the storm.

In Haiti alone, 136 people have been confirmed dead so far, with the number expected to climb as the weather calms.

Facebook has activated a feature on its website, allowing those in the affected areas to notify their friends that they are safe.

If the storms get in each other’s path, experts fear it could create the Fujiwara effect, named after Japanese meteorologist Sakarei Fujiwara, which occurs when two tropical cyclones are less than 900 miles apart. It could cause one storm to be consumed by another or both to rotate cyclonically about each other.

Some models see Matthew doing a U-turn and head back to Florida for a devastating double hit.

Gov. Rick Scott announced that he has authorized another 1,000 National Guards after he activated 2,500 on Thursday to help with the evacuations across the state – and the aftermath of the hurricane. Another 4,000 available if needed, Scott said.

‘We are going to get ready, but this is going to be catastrophic,’ he warned. ‘If you need to evacuate and you haven’t, evacuate. Time is running out.’

The storm could have devastating consequences for Florida residents, many of whom have fled their homes with no idea of what state they will be in when they return.

Rosa Linda Román and her family are terrified after pouring their dreams into their new home: a boat docked in West Palm Beach, Florida.

‘The boat is in direct path of the hurricane at this point. If it hits as the model predicts, we will not have a home anymore,’ Román said.

Gov Scott, warned his state that they needed to ‘prepare for a direct hit’ as he declared a state of emergency.

‘That means people have less than 24 hours to prepare, evacuate and shelter. Having a plan in place could mean the difference between life and death.’

South Carolina has told about a quarter million people to leave the coast and Gov. Nikki Haley says she currently plans to order more evacuations for two more counties Thursday, bringing the total to about 500,000 people

South Carolina has told about a quarter million people to leave the coast and Gov. Nikki Haley says she currently plans to order more evacuations for two more counties Thursday, bringing the total to about 500,000 people

The hurricane is predicted to hit Miami first and will move north, hitting around the coastal town of Port St Lucie at 8am

The hurricane is predicted to hit Miami first and will move north, hitting around the coastal town of Port St Lucie at 8am

In the eye of the storm: Most of Florida's east coast, along with the Bahamas has been placed on a Hurricane Warning

In the eye of the storm: Most of Florida’s east coast, along with the Bahamas has been placed on a Hurricane Warning

Hurricane Matthew has strengthened to a Category Four with wind speeds of 140mph, and could cause surges of up to 11 feet in some areas in Florida

Hurricane Matthew has strengthened to a Category Four with wind speeds of 140mph, and could cause surges of up to 11 feet in some areas in Florida

The powerful and deadly storm has started hitting southeast Florida and has winds up to 130mph as of 11pm Thursday 

The powerful and deadly storm has started hitting southeast Florida and has winds up to 130mph as of 11pm Thursday

Parts of Georgia, North Carolina and South Carolina are expected to receive heavy rain up to 15 inches from the storm

Parts of Georgia, North Carolina and South Carolina are expected to receive heavy rain up to 15 inches from the storm

There is a widespread power outage threat that is expected between Florida and parts of North Carolina from the storm

There is a widespread power outage threat that is expected between Florida and parts of North Carolina from the storm

 The creepy image, appears to show a white grinning skull, with a glowing red eye, flicked with green at its very center. It appeared in a weather map of the storm as it hit landfall in Haiti on Wednesday

 The creepy image, appears to show a white grinning skull, with a glowing red eye, flicked with green at its very center. It appeared in a weather map of the storm as it hit landfall in Haiti on Wednesday

SOURCE: Daily Mail